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The White House and an Unused Vice President

July 26, 2017

- by Marcus Aurelius

Nature rewards the strong. We see this in sports, war, and politics. This is the idea behind the saying, “The best defense is a good offense.” So, you would think more politicians would go on offense in today’s political civil war in America.

For example, Republicans refuse to go on offense. They think it’s cute to use their offices to mire down the nation. These supposed adults are showing they hate virtue. Western legislatures attract cowards. They allow incompetent people to make important decisions with no personal accountability. They attract people who love to do things in the dark, out of sight of the people. They are magnets for those who love dishonest gain. These facts are part of the systemic failure of modern Western congresses and parliaments.

Therefore, if the White House wants to move the nation, it can increase the influence of the Vice President in his role as President of the Senate.

Article I, Section 3, Clause 4 of the US Constitution makes the Vice President the President of the Senate. It is the only power the Constitution assigns to the Vice President. In the early days of the Republic, Vice Presidents took a much more active role in shaping the Senate agenda. Lately, Vice Presidents of both parties have abdicated this Constitutional duty. The Vice President is entitled to rule on matters of order. That is a significant power in parliamentary procedure. He can make many Senate appointments. This allows the Vice President to weaken opponents and strengthen allies. Regardless of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the President of the Senate has at least as much power as the President Pro Tempore of the Senate. A plain reading of Article I, Section 3, Clauses 4 and 5 of the US Constitution is unmistakable.

There are many more tactics in the Constitution. The idea is to implement as many as possible of these novel attacks. This will immediately put the opponents on defense. It will take them out of familiar territory. This will confuse the opponents. It will divide their resources. It will make them think in novel ways, which they have shown an inability to do well. It will increasingly strain them. They will make mistakes, reveal cracks in their formation, and expose opportunities for knock-out blows.

As with Alexander the Great, the government will go to the strongest.

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