Menu
header photo

Blog Search

Comments

On the Constitution's Mention of Sanctuaries for Immigrants

- by Marcus Aurelius

Sanctuary Cities Anticipated in the Constitution

Now, regarding the Constitution itself, Article I, section 8 begins, “The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.” The Constitution way back then considered the issue of what is now called “sanctuary cities.” Since the Constitution went into effect in 1789 and Article I, section 8 allowed the states to allow anyone in their boundaries that they “shall think proper,” the “sanctuary city” idea was allowed for only 19 years. Everyone agreed that in 1808, Congress alone would determine who could become American and share its liberty.

Article I, section 8 of the Constitution says, “The Congress shall have Power … To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization.” So, after 1808, Congress alone was to have the power to secure American liberty to others that were not related by blood to the Founding Generation. No matter how oppressed someone was or how desperate any “huddled masses” were to come to America, it was not up to the foreigner to decide whether he could be an American and enjoy the prosperity of a free people. Congress alone would set the standard of who deserved American freedom, and who were simply too cowardly to change their own government. The Constitution was for Americans, and only Congress could bring others under its protection. The poem on the Statue of Liberty is not a legal or founding document. It is not an official statement of American values at all. In fact, it is a monument to an early attempt to destroy Western values.

For more detail, please see this article.

Whether we agree with it or not, we must be honest about what the Founders had in mind. They also allowed for amending the Constitution (which is the true way the Constitution remains "a living document' and is conspicuously NOT to take place by Article III judges), but they never allowed for violating it or federal laws made pursuant to it. 

This is sufficient to prove to a candid world for whom the Founders established America.

Go Back

Comment